Innovation Spotlight: New York Hospitals Are Improving Health, Enhancing Quality, and Reducing Costs.

Mercy Medical Center enhances sepsis care

According to CDC, at least 1.7 million adults in the U.S. develop sepsis and nearly 270,000 die as a result each year. In 2014, Mercy Medical Center (of the Catholic Health Services of Long Island system) formed a sepsis committee made up of medical staff from various departments. The team evaluated timely nursing assessment, early identification of barriers, improving caregiver education and the addressing of medical record challenges.

The sepsis committee took data from the evaluations and developed a Mercy Sepsis Program that implemented an intensive and multidisciplinary education program for clinical staff and their patients. The plan evaluated the most at-risk patients based on extensive data review, customizing the existing sepsis protocol and outlining opportunities on how to reduce the risk of sepsis. Additionally, the plan highlighted the importance of patient engagement and empowerment, The Program requires clinical staff to participate in annual multilevel sepsis education. It also:

  • implemented sepsis rapid response calls;
  • designed a nurse’s sepsis work sheet to improve communication from unit-to-unit and nurse-to-nurse;
  • used electronic medical records to support the sepsis bundle with early warnings and reminders built in; and
  • created an electronic sepsis screen where every patient, every day, on every shift is screened for sepsis.

In 2018, Mercy was recorded in the 97th percentile for three-hour bundle compliance and in the 98th percentile for the composite bundle adherence. Their sepsis order set usage increased from 36.6% in 2015 to 95.1% in 2018. The current median time to antibiotic is 33 minutes with a mean of 48 minutes.

For more information, contact Alida Almonte, director, public relations, at alida.almonte@chsli.org or at (516) 705-1871.

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